Disease awareness for a rare blood disorder

Swedish Orphan Biovitrum

Showing the stories of people who live a life with no compromises despite having a rare blood disease (hemophilia): This was the core idea behind the disease awareness campaign by Swedish Orphan Biovitrum (Sobi). Before the Covid-19 pandemic, “Liberate Life on Tour” visited people across Germany to create awareness through emotional short films about the possibility of a self-determined life in spite of having a chronic illness.

Situation

Only around 6,000 people in Germany, for example, suffer from hemophilia. Hemophilia impairs blood clotting. This means that injuries – internal as well as external – take much longer to stop bleeding, which can be very dangerous. Internal bleeding in the joints can be especially nasty. These can cause lifelong damages – including severe disability. Up until a few years ago, life for hemophilia sufferers was haunted by a devastating trio: death by bleeding, disability and poverty.

With its “Liberate Life” campaign, Sobi – a leading global biopharmaceuticals company – demonstrates impressively why things have definitively changed today.

 

Implementation

For implementation on the national level, “Liberate Life on Tour” used emotional short films to profile people with hemophilia who are able to lead self-determined lives despite having a chronic illness. Planning and implementation were handled by komm.passion, while studio Frische Brise Film took care of production. With prominent backup by actor and host Michael Kessler, the campaign toured Germany by bus.

 

Michael Kessler interviewed hemophilia sufferers about their personal stories:

“It was important to us that we could integrate three generations into the film to clearly show what the ongoing development of treatment means for the patients,” explains Mareika Humpf, Senior Project Manager Hemophilia at Sobi and the person in charge of the campaign. Conversations with some of Germany’s leading experts in the field of hemostaseology help with the medical background.

There are two versions of every piece: one for ordinary viewers and one for medical professionals. The central hub of the campaign for reaching medical professionals is Sobi’s website, where experts can help their colleagues dig deeper into the topic and the foundations of treatment.

The films for patients and their loved ones or for interested laypeople are available on the Liberate Life YouTube channel along with other video content.

The video series “Liberate Life on Tour” is one of the highlights of the multifaceted “Liberate Life” campaign. At liberatelife.de, other patients also show that there is so much more to their lives than hemophilia and that they don’t let the disease limit their freedom. This target group is primarily reached on Instagram and Facebook.

 

The outcome:
Film premiere with Michael Kessler at Germany’s number-one hemostaseology congress, followed by a broad campaign in specialist media and on social media platforms for medical professionals.